News

Camden People’s Theatre Announces Spring Season

By Julia Rank

16 February 2012

Following on from their first programmed event together, Frankland & Sons, new Camden People’s Theatre co-artistic directors Jenny Paton and Brian Logan have announced their first full season, featuring  “trailblazing new and experimental theatre, music, poetry, interactive performances, media and puppetry.”

The season begins with the theatre’s annual Sprint season, running from March 9th-31st. Sprint began in 1997 as a showcase for “physical, visual and unusual theatre.” Highlights include the science-theatre influenced Your Last Breath by 2011 Fringe First winners Curious Directive, unraveling the landscapes of the heart and our own personal geographies. Theatre maker Thomas Eccleshare and illustrator Serge Seidlitz collaborate on a live comic-strip based on the medieval poem Pearl and Avon Calling by The Other Way Works will be performed in audience members’ own homes; an Avon party with a twist. New works-in-progress include Chloe Dechery, Jessica Latowicki (Made in China) and NIE, and brand new CPT-developed shows as part of the theatre’s artist development scheme.

Stillpoint Theatre will be presenting Triptych: Three Attempts at Love by Rachel Blackman, dealing with the struggle to love and Resuscitate Theatre  present a new interpretation of The Bacchae, merging media, puppetry, live action and physical theatre. There’s more audience interaction as Amy Lamé invites you to join her for her Morrisey-themed birthday birthday party in Unhappy Birthday, a celebration of nostalgia and teenage obsession.

Politics take centre stage in Kieran Hurley and Gary McNair’s double bill Hitch and Crunch, raising questions about the purpose of political protest, the limits of personal power and the possibility of change. Boogalu Stu will be performing “a hilarious and fast-paced version of the X-Factor” in Pop Magic, combining cabaret, pop music and audience participation with cutting-edge recording technology and social media. The final production in the spring season is Knight Watch: South’Story by Inua Ellams presented by Fuel Theatre. Commissioned by the Albany and suitable for teenagers, “Ellams conjures the violence of a city not unlike London and imagines a more beautiful world beyond it.” The show will take place in a car park, tunnel or public square near CPT.

For more information, dates and tickets, visit Camden People’s Theatre’s website.


Related Features

  • Navigating the Fringe. Heather Doole on marketing and the management of expectations in Edinburgh.
  • Power Play. Ben Power on the venue formerly known as The Shed and adapting Medea for the National.
  • Netherland. Jeremy Herrin on his plans for Headlong and his production of Jennifer Haley's The Nether.