Reviews

Review: Death of England: Delroy (online)

'To be responsive is to be quick on your feet but no less considered for it': Frey Kwa Hawking writes on Roy Williams and Clint Dyer's agile sequel to Death of England.

Published Yesterday

Features

A broken story for broken times

Maddy Costa turns her interview with Encounter's director Jen Malarkey into an interactive twine story, ahead of Friday's stream of The Kids Are Alright.

24 November


Reviews

Review: A Passion Play by Margaret Perry (online)

Hockey, tea-towels and God: Lily Levinson reviews a 'careful and delicate production' of Margaret Perry's radio play about a burgeoning teenage romance.

27 November

Reviews

Review: The Journey by Scott Silven (online)

Smoke and mirrors: Fergus Morgan writes on a Zoom magic show that doesn't pull off all its tricks.

26 November

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Reviews

Review: Lament for Sheku Bayoh by Hannah Lavery (online)

"Whose eyes are being opened?" Angelo Irving writes on a narrative of systemic racism in Scotland that feels all too familiar.

24 November

Reviews

Review: The Aftermath at The Piece Hall, Halifax (online)

Growing pains: Louise Jones reviews Northern Rascal's outdoor dance piece made with a group of twenty 16-25 year olds from Calderdale.

23 November

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Features
Lily Levinson

“There is no recipe”: Cooking up community projects at Battersea Arts Centre

Lily Levinson speaks to the artists, activists and participants working together to reimagine how BAC engages with its local community.

Fergus Morgan

Hannah Lavery: “If we do not revise our history, then that’s dangerous”

Poet-turned-playwright Hannah Lavery discusses racism in Scotland, her 'wilderness years', and her new play, Lament for Sheku Bayoh.

Exeunt Staff

Where to watch (and listen to) theatre online

Plan your Autumn of sofa-bound theatre with our big list of livestreams, archive recordings and podcasts.

Neil Bettles

Could virtual reality change the way we see theatre?

Neil Bettles, artistic director of Manchester-based company ThickSkin, writes on how experimenting with VR could bring touring theatre to new audiences

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Reviews

Review: Telephone by Coney (online)

Missed connections: Alice Saville and Hannah Greenstreet have a phone conversation about Coney's interactive telephone exchange performance.

19 November

Reviews

Review: Tabletop Shakespeare by Forced Entertainment (online)

Kitchen-sink drama: Ava Wong Davies reviews Forced Entertainment's domestic, unexpectedly moving retellings of Shakespeare's plays.

12 November

Reviews

Review: The Ghost Caller by Headlong

Grief encounter: Louise Jones reviews Headlong's ghost story, reimagined as a performance via telephone.

11 November

Reviews

Review: Dot. Dot. Dot. at Royal Lyceum, Edinburgh (online)

'A story without an ending': Andrew Edwards writes on Daniel Kitson's account of the pandemic, from within the thick of it.

6 November


More Features

21 October
Jade Montserrat

Reseeding connections

Jade Montserrat writes on the germination process of her new filmed performance, part of performingbordersLIVE20.


12 October
Angelo Irving

It’s time for artists to speak out against government gaslighting

As artists come under pressure not to bite the hand that feeds them, Angelo Irving argues that it's time to see the government's actions for what they really are.


8 October
Rosemary Waugh

Debbie Hannan: “I’m stepping onto the ship at the exact moment it’s hitting the iceberg!” 

Traverse Theatre's incoming co-artistic director Debbie Hannan talks class, the fringe, and rethinking theatre's power structures.


26 September
Alice Saville

People are theatre’s biggest asset; it’s time to start valuing them

As the UK's leaders use the language of business to justify further devastation to theatre, Alice Saville argues that they're looking for value in the wrong places.


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